Silk fibroin for skin injury repair: where do things stand?

last updated: 2024-02-28
ProjectFoReCaST :: publications list
TitleSilk fibroin for skin injury repair: where do things stand?
Publication TypeReview Paper
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsGholipourmalekabad M., Sapru S., Samadikuchaksaraei A., Reis R. L., Kaplan D. L., and Kundu S. C.
EditorsProw T.
Abstract Text

Several synthetic and natural materials are used in soft tissue engineering and regenerative medicine with varying degrees of success. Among them, silkworm silk protein fibroin, a naturally occurring protein-based biomaterial, exhibits many promising characteristics such as biocompatibility, controllable biodegradability, tunable mechanical properties, aqueous preparation, minimal inflammation in host tissue, low cost and ease of use. Silk fibroin is often used alone or in combination with other materials in various formats and is also a promising delivery system for bioactive compounds as part of such repair scenarios. These properties make silk fibroin an excellent biomaterial for skin tissue engineering and repair applications. This review focuses on the promising characteristics and recent advances in the use of silk fibroin for skin wound healing and/or soft-tissue repair applications. The benefits and limitations of silk fibroin as a scaffolding biomaterial in this context are also discussed. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: Silk protein fibroin is a natural biomaterial with important biological and mechanical properties for soft tissue engineering applications. Silk fibroin is obtained from silkworms and can be purified using alkali or enzyme based degumming (removal of glue protein sericin) procedures. Fibroin is used alone or in combination with other materials in different scaffold forms, such as nanofibrous mats, hydrogels, sponges or films tailored for specific applications. The investigations carried out using silk fibroin or its blends in skin tissue engineering have increased dramatically in recent years due to the advantages of this unique biomaterial. This review focuses on the promising characteristics of silk fibroin for skin wound healing and/or soft-tissue repair applications.

 

JournalAdvanced Drug Delivery Reviews
Volume153
Pagination28-53
Date Published2019-10-31
PublisherElsevier
ISSN0169-409X
DOI10.1016/j.addr.2019.09.003
URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169409X19301644
KeywordsSilk fibroin, Biomaterials, Wound healing, Skin substitute, Tissue engineering, regenerative medicine.
RightsrestrictedAccess
Peer reviewedyes
Statuspublished

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